The drugs, round 2

Below is a list of the drugs I’ll be taking under the second part of my chemotherapy regime, which begins later today with round 1 and, assuming all goes well, ends on 25 November with round 4.

Yes, there’s a lot there, but I’m just a little concerned that there are just two anti-sickness drugs to take after these next four rounds as opposed to the three that there were with the four rounds that have just ended. The wonderful Emend/aprepitant is missing from the list. I’ve been told it’s not needed because paclitaxel, the chemo drug I’m starting on now, is less likely to induce nausea and vomiting than doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, the two chemo drugs I was having before. I guess you’ve got to trust the professionals. They got it right last time. Fingers crossed.

Drug

What is this for?

Manufacturer

Comments

Palonosetron (Aloxi®)

Anti-sickness

Chugai Pharma

Pre-medication

Dexamethasone

Anti-sickness/prevent hypersensitivity reaction

Hospira UK Ltd

Pre-medication and post chemotherapy

Chlorphenamine

Anti-histamine to ameliorate hypersensitivity reaction

Archimedes Pharma UK

Pre-medication

Ranitidine

Histamine receptor 2 antagonist, pre-medication

GSK

Pre-medication

Sodium Chloride 0.9%

To keep IV line patent

Baxter UK Ltd

Line Flush

PACLITAXEL

Chemotherapy

Hospira

 

Domperidone

Anti-sickness

Generic brand

Post Chemotherapy

Laxido®

For constipation

Galen Ltd

For gentle relief of constipation if needed

Biotene®

For oral hygiene

GSK

Non-alcohol based mouthwash

Onicolife® nail drops

To strengthen nail cuticles

MosaicLife

Lipegfilgrastim (Lonquex®)

To boost white blood cell count

Teva Pharma

Long acting Granulocyte-Colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)

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5 thoughts on “The drugs, round 2

  1. It’s a daunting list of meds Maureen but, as you say, you can only trust the professionals to know what they are doing. So fingers crossed you keep on ‘tolerating the chemo well’ and does this mean you are at the halfway mark? That would be good! xx

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  2. […] The sister listens to my chest with a stethoscope for any sign of infection. She’d hear a rattling noise if there were; she doesn’t. I’m told to open my mouth and say “aaah”; nothing terrible there. A light is shone into my eyes; yes, it’s conjunctivitis. She says they’ll contact the oncologist to discuss things and to suggest I should perhaps be given some antibiotics to take at home. As if I didn’t have enough drugs to take at home already (see The drugs, round 2, 13 October). […]

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