It’s not over ’til it’s over

The hospital-based phase of my breast cancer treatment has finished but there’s still lots going on. My final radiotherapy session was a week ago now (Bike 8 – Car 7. Victory is mine) but by tomorrow afternoon I’ll have been back at the centre every day this week except today. Given that I started radiotherapy on 4th February, that means I’ll have been there every weekday – including two days as an in-patient – for precisely a month. No wonder I’m tired. And there’s more to come.

On Monday, I had my post-radiotherapy appointment with the consultant oncologist who organised the radiotherapy treatment. Also on Monday, I had to have new dressings put on those parts of the irradiated area that are worst affected by the radiation. On Tuesday, I had a six-week check-up with the plastic and reconstructive surgeon. On Wednesday, I was back at the radiotherapy department to be checked over and to have fresh dressings applied. I’ll be there again tomorrow for the same.

Let’s start with the “radiotherapy-induced skin reaction”. This is really common in people receiving radiotherapy (Sunburnt backs, patchwork dressings and crop tops (Radiotherapy part 2)) and can involve redness (yes), dryness (yes), itchiness (yes) and skin breakdown, ie cracking or weeping (not quite, although one or two areas are still at risk). The reason they’re keeping a close eye on things is that radiotherapy side effects can continue to develop after treatment ends and indeed can be at their most severe around 7-10 days after your final session. While the radiographers don’t think the skin will break down now (if it did, I’d be at increased risk of infection), they’re continuing to take precautions until the 10 days are up. Better safe than sorry, especially with my record on infections.

On to Monday’s meeting with the oncologist. She examined the irradiated area and said she was “hopeful” the infection that had me in hospital for two days on iv antibiotics was resolved (It went downhill from there). I finished my course of antibiotics later on Monday and there’s been no flare-up, so it’s good news on that front.

There’s still swelling/fluid build-up in the reconstruction and under my arm and the cording  (where the lymph vessels have hardened following the removal of the axillary lymph nodes) there has got worse. The cording now stretches from where the reconstruction meets my chest to past the crook of my arm. The oncologist suggested that a massage treatment called manual lymphatic drainage or MLD might help with the swelling. From what I can tell, this could require sessions three times a week or more for up to three weeks. So much for finishing treatment. Except now, of course, instead of treating the cancer, we’re treating the side effects of cancer treatment. Major difference. The physiotherapy I was having – and loving – for the cording is on hold until the skin reactions from the radiotherapy clear up. The MLD wouldn’t start until then either.

As for the plastic surgeon, there’s good news there in that she didn’t seem overly concerned at the appearance of the reconstruction and surrounds… despite the swelling, redness, inflamed scars and indentations. She did agree it was not the “lovely” – my word, not hers – thing that it was in the aftermath of the operation. However, she said reassuringly that while it might take six months (yes, six months!) for everything to settle down and will likely require a second round of surgery to tidy things up, “I don’t think you’ll have any problems” in the longer term. Phew. My claim to fame is that she took a couple of photos for her collection. She didn’t often get to see her reconstructions like this, she said, ie in their full, immediate post-radiation, scarlet glory! I’m really not used to having this part of my anatomy photographed but I was happy to oblige.

The abdominal scar has healed really well. I got some advice on how best to massage the area above the scar to loosen it off (it’s still quite tight) and on scar care in general. Also, not that I did that that much of it before, but I can start running again. I’ve to wear two bras, though, a regular sports bra and a crop top!

Next week is shaping up to be a lot quieter on the appointments front. Hopefully the radiographers will sign me off at the beginning of the week and then I’ll have nothing until the following week when I’ve got appointments with the two consultant oncologists involved in my care. The oncologist responsible for the radiotherapy – a clinical oncologist – will review how the skin reactions and swelling are looking and perhaps I’ll get an idea of when I can restart physio and perhaps start this new MLD treatment. The oncologist who’s been responsible for all my drug treatment to date – a medical oncologist – will arrange a date for me to come in to the chemo unit for my next cycle of the bone-hardening drug, zoledronic acid (Breast cancer does indeed “come with baggage”). I’m to have this initially every three months and then every six months during the five years I’m on letrozole hormone therapy. I had the first cycle with my final chemo session last November. It’s hard to believe that was only three months ago. It seems like an absolute age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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